Alan Alda

2021

Born Alphonso Joseph D’Abruzzo on January 28th, 1936, in the New York’s Bronx, Alan Alda is an American actor and comedian. Mostly known for his role as Hawkeye Pierce in the television series “M*A*S*H” between 1972 and 1983, he has starred in over 30 films and several other television shows. The production of “QED” by Peter Parnell in 2001/2002 can be highlighted among the dozens of theatre shows he participated in, where Alda played the character of Richard Feynman. In 2004, Alda was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role in “The Aviator”. He had over fifty nominations for both the Emmys and the Globe Awards, having won 12 of those.

For 14 years, he served as the host of Scientific American Frontiers, a television show that explored innovative advances in science and technology. In 2009, he was a founder of the Stony Brook University’s Alan Alda Center for Communicating University Science, where he remains as a member of its advisory board. He is also on the advisory board of the Future of Life Institute and works on the board of the World Science Festival, where he also serves as a judge for the Math-O-Vision contest.

Alda participated in the BBC coverage of the opening of the Large Hadron Collider, at CERN, Geneva, in September 2008.

He was named an Honorary Fellow by the Society for Technical Communication in 2014 for his work with the Center for Communicating Science and the annual Flame Challenge. In that same year, Alda was awarded the American Chemical Society’s James T. Grady-James H. Stack Award for Interpreting Chemistry for the Public, and, in 2016, he was awarded the National Academy of Sciences Public Welfare Medal “for his extraordinary application of the skills honed as an actor to communicating science on television and stage, and by teaching scientists innovative techniques that allow them to tell their stories to the public”. He also received, in 2021, the Kavli Foundation’s first-ever Distinguished Kavli Science Communicator award for his “pioneering work in communicating the excitement, mystery and marvels of science”.

As an author, three of his memory books worth mentioning are “Never Have Your Dog Stuffed: and Other Things I’ve Learned”, “Things I Overheard While Talking to Myself“, and “If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face? My Adventures in the Art and Science of Relating and Communicating“, as well as the play “Radiance: The Passion of Marie Curie“.

 

More information: www.imdb.com and en.wikipedia.org

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